About Karo Sambhav

when was karo sambhav founded?

karo sambhav was formally established in December 2016, and started its first round of operations in 2017.

what does karo sambhav mean?

”karo sambhav” is a hindi expression with the literal meaning of “making possible”. our name is an invitation to everyone to create a cohesive circular economy movement.

what is karo sambhav’s mission?

our mission is to make recycling a way of life for a billion people. We collaborate with leading enterprises, strategic alliances and governments on circular economy and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)frameworks. Karo’sprogrammes cover e-waste, plastic packaging waste, battery waste and glass, while continuing exploration towards less scrutinised sectors like mattresses, textiles and tyres.
Since its inception, Karo Sambhav has driven industry-first practices on transparency, auditability, and collaborative programme implementation. From pioneering a solution for e-waste management industry with International Finance Corporation, to establishing a  venture with 30+FMCG brands to tackle the plastic waste crisis, Karo Sambhav utilises its core strengths of deep technical expertise, grassroots action, technology and systems thinking approach to create impact at scale.

is karo sambhav registered as a PRO?

Karo Sambhav was the first to be registered as a Producer Responsibility Organisation in India for e-waste. Download our authorisation here. You can find our name on the Central Pollution Control Board website here. We follow all regulations for the different types of waste, as per Indian legislation.

what sectors do you work in?

Our work is sector agnostic. While we focus on e-waste, plastic waste and battery waste as critical categories, we continue exploration of other waste streams like glass, tires, mattresses and textiles.

Circular Economy

What is a circular economy?

We take resources from the ground to make products we use. When we no longer want them, we throw them away: take-make-waste. This is called a linear economy. A circular economy is based on the principles of reducing waste and pollution, keeping products and materials in use, and regenerating natural systems.

why is circular economy important?

The current system is no longer effective for businesses, people, or the environment. It is imperative to transform all the elements of the take-make-waste system, including how we manage resources, how we make and use products, and what we do with the materials afterwards. Only then will we be able to create a thriving economy that can benefit everyone within the limits of our planet.

Shifting the system involves everyone and everything—from businesses, governments, and individuals to our cities, our products, and our jobs. By designing to minimize waste and pollution, recycling and reusing products and materials, and preserving our natural resources, we can drive a truly circular economy.

What is the difference between waste management and circular economy? aren’t they the same?

No. Circular economy is about looking at a system as a whole and seeing how it is all connected. Waste management focuses on the final stage of a product, whereas the circular economy looks across the lifecycle and crucially includes design. It is about redesigning systems to be more efficient and effective, so that ultimately there is no ‘waste’.

How does the circular economy help today's emissions and climate change?

The circular economy and climate change mitigation go hand-in-hand. There are many different facets to the circular economy including material efficiency, reuse and recycling- all of which have different impacts on the emissions.
For resource recover or recycling stage, one ton of e-waste can help prevent 0.87 MTCO2 of emissions while one ton of plastic waste can help prevent 1.34 MTCO2 of emissions.
The circular economy aims to find commercially viable ways of doing these while significantly reducing the energy needed to produce.

Extended Producer Responsibility

Bulk Consumers
Who is a Bulk Consumer?

Bulk consumer' means bulk users of electrical and electronic equipment such as Central Government or State Government Departments, public sector undertakings, banks, educational institutions, multinational organizations, international agencies, partnership and public or private companies that are registered under the Factories Act, 1948 (63 of 1948) and the Companies Act, 2013 (18 of 2013) and health care facilities which have turnover of more than one crore or have more than twenty employees”

What are the compliances we as a Bulk Consumer should fulfil?

ensure that e-waste generated by them is channelized through collection centre or dealer of authorized producer or dismantler or recycler or through the designated take back service provider of the producer to authorized dismantler or recycler;

  • maintain records of e-waste generated by them in Form-2 and make such records available for scrutiny by the concerned State Pollution Control Board;
  • ensure that such end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment are not admixed with e[1]waste containing radioactive material as covered under the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 (33 of 1962) and rules made there under;
  • file annual returns in Form-3, to the concerned State Pollution Control Board on or before the 30th day of June following the financial year to which that return relates. In case of the bulk consumer with multiple offices in a State, one annual return combining information from all the offices shall be filed to the concerned State Pollution Control Board on or before the 30th day of June following the financial year to which that return relates
What if we not fulfil the mentioned compliances?

SPCB can held your organization accountable and may impose penalty which will be bad for the brand image

How does financials work?

Do we pay as a Bulk Consumer to dispose or will Karo Sambhav be paying us? It is a mix of both as some of the material has a negative recycling value such as cartridges, etc. i.e., we need to pay to responsibly dispose it, whereas some material has a net positive value, wherein we get a fixed amount from the sales of secondary material to the recyclers, thus we pay for the same to the bulk consumers. Generally, a bulk consumer must share an inventory list with us, and we share formal quotation of the material. In certain cases, Bulk Consumers are more than happy in giving their e-waste free of cost and they are keen towards responsible recycling of the e-waste.

What all services you will be providing us?

We provide a mix of services that is required for responsibly disposing E-Waste as a Bulk Consumer i.e.,

  • Collection, and responsible recycling of E-waste
  • Development and management of compliance documentation
  • Employee awareness and engagement workshops including providing information material
  • Support for filling E-waste returns with State Pollution Control Board (SPCB)
  • Better rates than market or an opportunity to voluntarily dispose E-Waste and become sustainability champion. We also highlight it on all our social media channel(s)
  • PAN India Collection Network
How should we contact you?

You can reach out to us at engage@karosambhav.com or call us at our toll-free no. 12345678

Which all cities/geographies you’re based out?

We are based in 40 cities PAN India and our ever expanding our operations

Where is your headquarter located?

Corporate Office in Gurugram, Haryana and IT office in Bangalore, Karnataka

What type of E-Waste you collect?

Attached List of E-Waste

What should we do with materials such as CFLs, UV Bulbs and material as such?

We don’t deal with CFL Lights and material as such, as it does not have an authorized recycling solution.

Extended Producer Responsibility

What is end of life?

End of life (EOL), is the stage a product or material reaches when it is no longer of use. This could mean it is destined for a landfill, compost, or a recycle bin, depending on how the user disposes of the material when they are done using it. At Eastman, we try to ensure materials have a good EOL and are recycled molecularly or mechanically into new materials rather than having a bad EOL, sitting in a landfill or ending up in our environment or waterways.

What is e-waste? What are the E-Waste (Management) Rules, 2016?

E-waste is defined as “electrical and electronic equipment, whole or in part discarded as waste by the consumer or bulk consumer as well as rejects from manufacturing, refurbishment and repair processes”.
The E-Waste (Management) Rules, 2016 supersede the E-Waste (Management & Handling) Rules of 2011. The primary motivation behind the new Rules is to ensure the efficient collection and proper recycling of the categories of e-waste mentioned in Schedule – I of the Rules (Please see Annex I).
In addition to the previously covered producers, bulk consumers, collection centres, dismantlers and recyclers (under E-Waste Rules, 2011), the new Rules also include manufacturers, dealers, refurbishers and Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs) under its purview.

What is Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)? What is the difference between and Collective Producer Responsibility and an Individual Producer Responsibility?

The Rules define EPR as “responsibility of any producer of electrical or electronic equipment, for channelisation of e-waste to ensure environmentally sound management of such waste. “The basic concept is to promote environmental impact reduction at the end of life by:
Internalizing end-of-life cost at More recyclable and less toxic products the Manufactuing stage      
There are two types of EPR models available to producers:

  • Collective Producer Responsibility(CPR): In a CPR, producers cover their responsibilities via Producer Responsibility Organizations (PRO) which facilitate the collective handling of the waste
  • Individual Producer Responsibility (IPR): In an IPR, Producers are responsible for the end-of-life management of their own respective products and have to set up appropriate EPR systems.

Table 1 lists the difference between a CPR and an IPR system from an executable point of view.

What is Karo Sambhav? What are the benefits of joining Karo Sambhav?

Karo Sambhav is a tech-enabled, environmentally beneficial and socially responsible e-waste Producer Responsibility Organisation (PRO) of top brands such as Apple, Lenovo, Dell and HP. Karo’s members also include prominent distributors and importers. We have set-up an India-wide transformative solution on e-waste management with the aim of making recycling a way of life. We make it possible for people and institutions to responsibly recycling their electronic waste.

Our Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) solutions cover Information Communication Technology (ICT), Lighting and Consumer Electronics. We partner with industry associations, pollution control boards, state IT departments, municipal corporations, NGOs, informal sector waste pickers, collectors & aggregators, and responsible recyclers across India. International Finance Corporation (IFC, part of The World Bank group) has partnered with us for a pan-India project on the development and implementation of a PRO solution for the industry. Karo Sambhav enables producers to transcend the compliance boundaries. We help you become thought leaders by participating in the transformation of e-waste management in India.
If you are a producer of electronic goods and believe that solving the e-waste problem of India requires urgent attention we invite you to join us and comply as a leader by:

  • Bringing unparalleled transparency in the collection, logistics and recycling of e-waste
  • Implementing a range of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) programmes in collaboration with local governments, institutions and civil society
  • Creating a discourse on e-waste: What it is, why it should not be hoarded or irresponsibly discarded and why it needs to be recycled responsibly
  • Setting-up take-back channels/points, and collecting the old/unwanted electronic products/parts that have reached their end-of-life
  • Meeting your collection targets in a cost-effective way
  • Ensuring environmentally sound and socially responsible recycling: We use stringent criteria to select our recycling partners and continually work with them to upgrade their practices
  • Creating a reach across all states of India using our extensive ecosystem and mobile technology
  • Providing real-time monitoring and data analytics
What is recycling?

Recycling refers to the recovery of the materials used in the manufacture of electronic devices (e.g., gold, mercury, copper, aluminum, plastic and glass), which can then be used in the manufacture of new devices, reducing the consumption of non-renewable resources.
Responsible recycling also ensures that these materials, some of which are extremely toxic, do not find their way into landfills to cause harm to people or the environment.

Why should e-waste be handled properly? Is it toxic?

Some of the components of e-waste contain materials such as lead, cadmium, mercury, polychlorinated bi-phenyls (PCBs), etched chemicals, brominated flame retardants which are hazardous in nature. Therefore e-waste should be handled in an environment-friendly manner to prevent this hazardous material polluting the environment.
E-waste as such is not toxic. However, processing of e-waste to recover valuable materials such as lead, copper and gold is hazardous. Therefore a careful environmentally sound recovery process is required for recycling the e-waste.

What is included in the awareness session?

The awareness session shall act as a pre-cursor to the collection drive which is conducted as per the requirement of the Stakeholder.
The awareness session is >1 hour and covers the basics of e-waste on a global and domestic context, the e-waste rules in India, the concept of EPR, our responsibilities as Bulk Consumers/Stakeholders/Consumers.

Where can we drop our e-waste if there is no collection centre near us?

Karo Sambhav has its authorized collection centers in many cities across India. However if the Stakeholder is unable to locate a collection center around them, they can always call at the Karo Sambhav helpline, thereafter a pick-up will be arranged for the concerned Stakeholder.

CAN YOU TELL ME SOME OTHER COLLECTION POINT CLOSE TO MY HOUSE?

Please refer to Karo Sambhav website (www.karosambhav.com) to see the complete list of collection points. Here is the website link: http://karosambhav.com/collection-points/

We can act responsibly when it comes to e-waste, but how do we influence the others to not hand it over to unauthorized channels?

One of the main reasons why Karo Sambhav encourages the awareness session is because of the ripple effect it creates. We believe in the power of a good cause. We trust that once our stakeholders have become aware of the harms posed by the mismanagement off e-waste, they will be able to drive, even if it is a small amount of change, in their own circles; thus encouraging more people to be responsible as well.

How do we know that Karo Sambhav is handling e-waste responsibly?

We provide adequate proofs of destruction and/or recycling to our stakeholders. We can provide videos of the same on request of the stakeholder.

Who falls under the category of ‘Producers’ in the Rules?

According to the new Rules, ‘Producer’ means any person who:

  • manufactures and offers to sell electrical and electronic equipment and their components or consumables or parts or spares under its own brand; or
  • offers to sell under its own brand, assembled electrical and electronic equipment and their components or consumables or parts or spares produced by other manufacturers or suppliers; or
  • offers to sell imported electrical and electronic equipment and their components or consumables or parts or spares;

Therefore, even importers of EEE are now covered under the definition of ‘Producers’ which was not the case before.

What are an electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) producer's obligations with regard to new Rules? Are there any legal sanctions for non-compliance with these requirements?

The following are the main responsibilities of Producers under the new Rules:

  • Set up a system to implement EPR with proper means of collection, channelization and disposal of end-of-life e-waste in accordance with a Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) approved EPR-Authorisation plan.
  • Spread awareness regarding appropriate contact avenues (addresses, emails, telephone numbers, etc.) for information regarding proper handling of the e-waste, hazardous constituents, hazards of improper management and disposal of e-waste and means available to consumers for return and recycling of their e-waste.

The EPR- Authorisation plan should constitute of a collection scheme of the e-waste placed on the market, through means such as ‘buy-back arrangements, exchange schemes, Deposit Refund System, etc’ and direct it, whether directly or through authorised agencies (such as PROs) to registered recyclers.

Failure to comply with these regulations can result in severe penalisation. Under Chapter III, Section 13(iv), ‘in the event of refusal of Extended Producer Responsibility - Authorisation by the Central Pollution Control Board, the producer will forfeit his right to put any Electrical and Electronic Equipment in the market till such time the Extended Producer Responsibility - Authorisation is granted.” This applies to all the ‘Producers’ covered in Q.2.

In addition to this, Section 7 of Chapter II states that “Operation without Extended Producer Responsibility-Authorisation by any producer… shall be considered as causing damage to the environment”. This is in direct violation of Section 15 of the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. The penalty for such a contravention is imprisonment from a term of up to five years (can be extended to seven years in case of continued contravention) and heavy fines.

E-Waste

What is e-waste?

E-waste is defined as electrical and electronic equipment, whole or in part discarded as waste or reached its end-of-life as well as rejects from manufacturing, refurbishment and repair processes.

What is EPR?

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) means that it is the responsibility of the producer who puts their product in the market to safely dispose after it is no longer useful/ discarded by the consumer.

What are E-waste (Management) Rules?

The E-Waste (Management) Rules, 2016 supersede the E-Waste (Management & Handling) Rules of 2011. The implementation of rules started from 1st October 2017. As per the mandate, the rules apply to every manufacturer, producer, consumer, bulk consumer, collection centres, dealers, e-retailer, refurbisher, dismantler and recycler involved in manufacture, sale, transfer, purchase, collection, storage and processing of e-waste or electrical and electronic equipment.

The mandate lists down in detail responsibilities of various stakeholders involved with electronic products from its manufacturing stage to its recycling stage and thereafter.

Click here to Download the E-Waste (Management) Rules of 2016 issued by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Government of India.
Click here to Download the E-waste (Management) Amendment Rules, 2018 issued by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Government of India.
Click here to Download Implementation Guidelines for E-Waste (Management) Rules 2016 issued by CPCB

Who is a ‘Producer’?

According to the Rules, ‘Producer’ means any person/entity who/which:

  • manufactures and offers to sell electrical and electronic equipment and their components or consumables or parts or spares under its own brand; or
  • offers to sell under its own brand, assembled electrical and electronic equipment and their components or consumables or parts or spares produced by other manufacturers or suppliers; or
  • offers to sell imported electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) and their components or consumables or parts or spares;
Do I need an EPR Authorisation as a producer of electronics?

Yes, you need to apply for an EPR Authorisation as a producer of electronics by filing an EPR Application to the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB).

What do I need to do as a Producer under EPR?

The main responsibilities of Producers as per the rules are to:

  • Set up a system with proper means of collection, channelisation and disposal of end-of-life e-waste
  • Complete e-waste collection targets
  • Spread awareness for information regarding proper handling of the e-waste, hazardous constituents, hazards of improper management and disposal of e-waste and means available to consumers for return and recycling of their e-waste.

Do we need to conduct e-waste awareness activities? Is it mandatory?

Yes, conducting awareness programmes among the consumers of electronics is mandatory.

Are there any penalties for non-compliance with the rules?

Yes, failure to comply with the rules can result in severe penalisation as below:

  • Inability of the company to put products in Indian market if CPCB refuses or cancels EPR Authorisation due to any non-compliance to the rules.
  • If a producer is operating without EPR Authorisation, it will be considered as causing damage to the environment which is a direct violation of Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. The penalty for such violation is imprisonment for up to five years (can be extended to seven years in case of continued contravention) and heavy fines.
If I am a Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) organization putting products in the Indian market, do I need an authorisation?

No, it is not required to get an authorisation in case you are registered as an MSME organisation under the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Development Act, 2006.

How many days does it take to get an EPR authorisation?

As per the rules, CPCB shall issue EPR authorisation within 120 days from the date of receipt of complete applications submitted to CPCB. In case of any deficiency in the application, CPCB may respond with checklist of short comings within 25 days.   Click here to Download Revised SoP for Grant of EPR-Authorisation under E-Waste (Management) Rules, 2016 as Amended.

Consumer

which categories of e-waste does karo sambhav accept?

karo sambhav collects electronics and electrical equipment that’s been discarded and has reached its end of their product life for recycling. to view a detailed checklist of the products we recycle, click here

where does karo sambhav collect the e-waste from?

karo sambhav works on a B2B and B2C model. we collect e-waste from aggregators, waste pickers, educational institutions, NGOs, business entities and corporates. we also collect e-waste from individuals from residential societies/complexes during collection drive with awareness sessions.

how can i dispose my e-waste?

Any quantity of e-waste can be disposed and dropped at a Karo Sambhav collection centre nearest to you.

How can I be sure that my e-waste has been recycled?

The e-waste collected by Karo Sambhav is send to a dismantling/recycling facility. At the end of the recycling process, we provide a certificate of destruction or recycling and a material recovery report is shared with our clients to validate the recycling process.

Plastic Waste

What “plastic waste” is covered under Plastic Waste Management Rule, 2016?

Any plastic material which contains ingredients such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), high density polyethylene (HDPE), Vinyl, low density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene resins, multi-materials like acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, Polybutylene terephthalate is considered as plastic waste.
Click here to Download the Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016
Click here to Download the Plastic Waste Management (Amendment) Rules, 2018

Does Plastic Waste Management Rule, 2016 apply to me?

If you are a producer that is a persons engaged in manufacture or import or brand owner of carry bags or multi-layered packaging or plastic sheets and includes industries or individuals using plastic sheets or covers made of plastic sheets or multi layered packaging for packaging or wrapping the commodity.

Who all needs a registration?

Any manufacture, importer, stocking, distribution, sale and use of carry bags,plastic sheets and multi layered packaging will need the registration with the State Pollution Control Board or Pollution Control Committee.

Batteries Waste

Which “battery” is covered under Draft Battery Waste Management Rule, 2020?

Batteries can be any source of electrical energy generated by direct conversion of chemical energy and includes:

What does karo sambhav mean?

”karo sambhav” is a hindi expression with the literal meaning of “making possible”. our name is an invitation to everyone to create a cohesive circular economy movement.

  • Disposable primary (Alkaline/Mercury/Silver oxide/Zinc Carbon) batteries; or
  • Rechargeable secondary (Lead Acid/Lithium Ion/Lithium Metal/Nickel-Cadmium) batteries; or
  • Other battery which is a source of electrical energy and contains (or may produce at end of its life) potassium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide or ammonium chloride or zinc chloride or sulfuric acid or pressurized sulfur dioxide gas or thionyl chloride or magnesium bromide or magnesium perchlorate or mercury or zinc or cadmium or nickel or lithium chloride or any other hazardous material as defined in Hazardous and Other Wastes (Management and Transboundary Movement) Rules, 2016
Which “battery” is exempted from the Draft Battery Waste Management Rule, 2020?

The regulations do not apply to batteries used in:

  • Equipment connected with the protection of the essential security interests (arms, ammunitions and war material, and intended specifically for military purposes);
  • Equipment designed to be sent into space (space exploration)
  • Emergency and alarm systems;
  • Emergency lighting; and
  • Medical Equipment
Does Draft Battery Waste Management Rules, 2020 apply to me?

Anyone who is involved in manufacture, processing, sale, purchase, collection, storage, re-processing and use of batteries or components, consumables and spare parts which make the product operational comes under the purview of the draft rules.
The mandate lists down in detail responsibilities of various stakeholders involved in the use of battery in their products from its manufacturing stage to its recycling stage and there after.
Click here to Download the Draft Battery Waste Management Rules, 2020 issued by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Government of India.