circular economy model
circular economy principles

E-waste stands out as an alarming issue in a technology-run world. An upsurge in the consumption of electronic gadgets and the industrial revolution are the leading causes of the growing e-waste stream. Think about it—how often do you upgrade or switch up your cell phone every time a new model hits the market? Have you been using the same computer all your life? The answer is more likely no! Unfortunately, electronic products comprise a fair number of toxic substances. Improper handling of such products is detrimental to the environment.

It is only the tip of the iceberg! The disastrous environmental impacts are far more than global warming. Before delving into the adversities of toxic emissions, it is worth understanding that mindless piling of outdated electronic products in landfills must be brought to a screeching halt right away. Here’s why:

• Electronic gadgets or products that have hit the end of their life cycle can well be repurposed.

• The rich load of lead, zinc, barium, chromium, nickel, and other baneful chemicals is non-biodegradable and leaches into the environment, sullying the groundwater, air, and other elements of nature.

• Dismantling of electronics in landfills is mostly done by torching off the products in incinerators. The process, although quick, releases an ugly load of hydrocarbons into the air. What’s worse? It amps up greenhouse gas effects.

Furthermore, the odds of toxic e-waste contribute to devastating health impacts like neurological disorders, digestive problems, neonatal behavioural and cognitive issues, the Big C, and more. E-waste haulers and recyclers were brought into action to put an immediate check on the surging problem of unethical e-waste disposal practises. Unfortunately, recycling alone failed to work wonders.

The climate crisis and menacing health disorders are no longer the only significant problems. A global supply shortage of resources due to the gradual extinction of the earth’s natural resources springs up as a huge threat today. The odds of unsustainable resource consumption do not end here. The dwindling supply chain serves as a leading cause of inflation. As a result, the traditional and linear concepts of recycling or take-make-dispose have been effectively replaced by a far more resilient and newer circular economy approach.

Circular Economy—A new and strategic step towards the responsible recycling of e-waste.

Did you know that India is the 3rd major producer of e-waste, after the US and China? Regardless of how often most electronic manufacturers promise to create products that are resistant to wear and tear and long-lasting, the life-cycle of electronics does come to an end. Result? Surplus dumping of electronics in landfills. The only way to bring the challenges to a stop is by encouraging the corporate big guns and individuals to embrace a proven circular economy model.

So, what does 'circular economy' typically imply?

In the words of a layman, a circular economy is quite similar to recycling, only better. It is a far more sustainable approach that relies on an advanced framework of production and consumption of resources. The idea propagates, maximising the use of raw materials for as long as possible. Besides, the circular economy and sustainability work to close the gap between unnecessary resource production and the ecosystem's natural cycle. This, in turn, significantly cuts back the consumption of raw materials and introduces a responsible and innovative recycling method of giving products a second life.

Speaking of the circular economy, Karo Sambhav is a start-up that is making huge waves in combating the world's growing e-waste problem. The company is committed to rolling back the mammoth count of 3.2 million metric tonnes of e-waste. Wondering how? Well, India is certainly in the lead in terms of technology. This quite explains the surge in electronic waste. The company believes in integrating the power of collaboration and technology to tackle and scale back the problems at large.

What is Karo Sambhav’s proposed and practised circular economy model?

1. Going zero waste in a jiffy is difficult. The company intends to collaborate and bring the leading manufacturers, recyclers, and distributors together.

2. Setting up the right collection channels in the nooks and crannies of the country

3. Teaching the tricks of responsible recycling

4. Initiating a system change that focuses on a better use of natural resources, less consumption, and proper refurbishing of materials to stop the scarcity of raw resources.

In short, circular economy principles are very different from recycling. Traditionally, recycling refers to the conversion of a waste product into a valuable and reusable product. Circular economy and sustainability, on the other hand, reject the entire concept of a product's lifecycle and concentrate on ways to prevent waste generation in the first place.

Karo Sambhav collaborates with leading organisations to jointly develop industry frameworks, standards, governance mechanisms, systems and processes that advance the transition to circular economy. know more about our alliances.

alliances

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