top e-waste management companies in India
e-waste management
waste management

Did you know that electronic waste happens to be an exponentially growing waste stream? Do you know why? Rapid developments in various fields of business, like information technology and communication, spark enhanced usage of electronic products. What’s more, the quick and frequent upgrade of products coerces consumers into discarding their old equipment for new ones, resulting in more waste. It is critical to put a stop to the increasing waste stream right away. Recycling is undoubtedly the first solution that comes to mind. Unfortunately, simple recycling practices are not enough to tackle the surging piles of e-waste. Circular economy or a dedicated e-waste management system is an urgent requirement.  

Why put emphasis on circular economy?

Recycling and circular economy are distinct but, in many ways, similar. The former kicks off at the end of a product’s lifecycle. However, circular economy focuses on strategies that nip the creation of waste in the first place. Recycling refers to the action of transforming waste into a reusable product or material. It is also a linear concept that revolves around the theories of take-make-dump. Businesses embrace recycling to roll back the costs of production in a competitive market.

No one truly realises the side-effects such as environmental consequences and other externalities.  

Circular economy is a much more robust, pragmatic, and structured approach. It intends to tackle the surging global issues of climate crisis, loss of biodiversity, and hazardous health conditions owing to excessive waste build-up and pollution. Circular economy focuses on the increasing use of products. The idea of trashing products first and repurposing them later defies the purpose of circular economy. The economic system prioritises the creation of a closed loop to ensure the long-term and repeated use of resources and materials. It helps to reduce carbon footprints and re-use finite natural resources.

E-waste: a striking problem in India.

Did you know that India is one of the bottom five countries on the Environmental Performance Index? It is also one of the top producers of e-waste, following China, the United States, and Japan. The country produces more than two million tonnes of e-waste every year. It is no secret that electronic dumps contain substantial quantities of toxic elements like lithium, mercury, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, etc. The chemicals leach into the ground, aquatic bodies, and air, causing detrimental impacts on the environment and human health. Hence, initiating responsible dismantling and e-waste management is the need of the hour.

What are the predominant challenges for e-waste in India?

Karo Sambhav, one of the top e-waste management companies in India, clearly spills the beans on the challenges of processing e-waste.

1. Poor infrastructure to recycle e-waste

Sadly, India has very few recognised and government-approved recycling centres to dismantle and repurpose electronic waste. Did you know that the Indian government has introduced a grant scheme for proficient e-waste management facilities? As per the grant, the government would readily fund 25% to 50% of the expenses in setting up infrastructure to repurpose electronic waste efficiently and responsibly. Even then, recycling centres and organised supply chains are very few in number.

2. A serious lack of awareness

Most consumers have little or no knowledge of the consequences of reckless e-waste disposal. The idea of sustainable waste management is equally vague. Furthermore, very few cities or locations have dedicated collection points where consumers can drop off their so-called electronic scraps voluntarily.

3. Mismanagement of products  

In the present times, sourcing e-waste is challenging. Circular economy, although a term in use for years, is a new entry in the business channels. Companies ranging from start-ups to the top e-waste management companies in India invest heavily in order to establish collection hubs or adhere to circular economy standards.

The information barriers are real. For example, there is a lack of knowledge about cost-effective and efficient e-waste management techniques, as well as how to maximise the utility of end-of-life products.

4. Unsustainable and ecologically degrading practises

Despite the urgency of formal and responsible dismantling of electronic waste, the actual waste processed is significantly lower. Most of the formal recycling centres currently available operate at dwindled capacities, owing to the inability to source waste. What’s worse? The ignorant mass continues to dispose of electronic waste in the most unfavourable conditions.

Karo Sambhav, a certified PRO in India, endeavours to improvise and maximise the efficiency and scope of formal waste management. The organisation uses cutting-edge technology and an upgraded EPR framework to educate and incentivize electronic waste recycling.

Karo Sambhav collaborates with leading organisations to jointly develop industry frameworks, standards, governance mechanisms, systems and processes that advance the transition to circular economy. know more about our alliances.

alliances

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