circular flow of economic activity
circular economy model
circular flow of economic activity
EPR and Circular Economy

Single-use plastic packaging waste has cropped up as an alarming issue in recent times. Would you agree any less? Of course, the buzz to raise consumer awareness around packaging and plastic waste is quite high. Haven’t you heard of recycling and a circular economy model? Unfortunately, as the phrase goes, ‘the proof is in the pudding;’ the landfills remain unaffected regardless of the reformative drive. Think about it – packaging is ubiquitous. From securing fragile products from breakage to minimising food waste, packaging plays a key role in various lines of business. The dramatic expansion of new-end markets globally and a spike in cheaper choice of substrates like plastic is definitely not underrated. Sadly, the growing usage of single-use packaging is burdening and detrimental to the environment.

Did you know that the world generates approximately 400 million tonnes of plastic waste every year? India alone produces over 3.6 lakh million tonnes of plastic waste in a calendar year. Unfortunately, only 50% of discarded plastic is recycled efficiently. The leftover keeps filling up the unmanaged dump yards, aggravating environmental changes and planetary crises. Hence, it is a no-brainer that encouraging industries to rethink and embrace sustainable packaging options is a need of the hour.

Sustainability goals for the packaging industry

Speaking of packaging, it is no surprise that consumers primarily rely on the strength of a package and then brood over the environmental challenges created. In short, a package must be sturdy and not prone to breaking or leaking. In addition to strength, it is also critical to figure out alternative packaging options that are good for the environment, renewable, recyclable, or at least compostable. A circular flow of economic activity highlights the importance of recyclable materials. Are you unaware of the perks? Let’s read:

• Recycling ensures that the majority of the components in a product are easy to extract, salvage, refurbish, and put back in the production cycle. It is also a core principle of circular economy and sustainability.

• Circular economy is all about adding more value to the life of spent products. It lowers the stress of scouting and mining newer resources that are only finite.

• Less wastage shrinks the growing size of landfills.

• Enhanced use of recyclable materials ensures sustainability and a strategic management system to tackle waste streams and reduce adverse environmental impacts.

Simply put, it is undeniably critical to move forward with sustainable packaging goals that adhere to the principles of a circular economy model. Also, it is equally significant to ensure that consumer expectations are met in terms of performance and the sturdiness of packages. Are you mapping out ideas that tick off the requirements? Strong partnerships and innovative thinking are key to figuring out packaging substrates that are recyclable and substantial.

Sustainable material options, best suited for the packaging industry

The significance of kissing goodbye to single-use plastic materials cannot be highlighted enough. It is environmentally degrading, non-recyclable, and highly hazardous to human health. It might surprise you to learn that it takes roughly 20-500 years for plastics to decompose and vanish from the face of the earth. That’s an overwhelmingly long time to eliminate the burgeoning plastic garbage. Since circular economy sustainability prioritises the use of environmental-friendly, renewable, and recyclable resources, especially for the packaging industry, here’s sharing insightful information about materials that make the cut.

Wood Fibre – The ease of recycling wood fibre is unmatched. Sourcing wood fibre is certainly in sync with a strategic circular economy model. Besides, it is a renewable resource only when the material is sourced responsibly and ethically. 

Have you been thinking of using paper as a packaging material? It’s certainly in vogue, implemented particularly by environmentalists and businesses dedicated to minimising packaging waste. Unfortunately, it is not abundantly recyclable, nor does it fit the description of circular economy and sustainability. Here’s why – paper materials are not infinitely recyclable. Instead, sourcing virgin fibres, specifically from the woods harvested for the first time, is a better and more renewable alternative. In short, fibre-based packaging solutions ensure sustainability, quality, and performance, ticking the boxes for both enterprises and consumers.

Karo Sambhav, a dedicated Public Responsibility Organisation, partners with leading enterprises, governments, manufacturers, and consumers to strategise, discover, educate, and encourage all to transition to a more sustainable, environment-friendly, and circular economy.

Karo Sambhav collaborates with leading organisations to jointly develop industry frameworks, standards, governance mechanisms, systems and processes that advance the transition to circular economy. know more about our alliances.

alliances

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